Northumberland National Park

With its clear air, clean waters and dark skies, it’s unsurprising the park is officially the country’s most tranquil location.
Covering almost a quarter of the county, Northumberland National Park is one of the least populated of the UK’s national parks.

Stretching over 400 square miles of amazing landscape, Northumberland National Park lays claim to some impressive credentials. Running in the uppermost section of the park towards the Scottish Border are the lofty Cheviot Hills, while the World Heritage Site of Hadrian’s Wall is in the south and Kielder Water & Forest Park to the west.

A wonderful wilderness to explore, the Northumberland National Park has a rich array of wildlife, from skylarks to red squirrel and otters.
A place for adventure, or relaxation you can be as active or laid back as you want here.
The Northumberland National Park as seen on Robson Green's Tales from Northumberland is a huge adventure playground, with every activity imaginable, from rock climbing and mountain biking to saddling up on a bike or horse.

Secluded, peaceful and unpsoilt, College Valley is one of the most tranquil, yet dramatic valleys in the National Park. Stay in the College Valley and take advantage of its remoteness, tranquility, night skies and wildlife by being there at dawn and dusk.

Strike out on a walk among the Cheviot or Simonside Hills, explore the valleys of clear rivers including the North Tyne, Rede, Coquet and Beamish and feel on top of the world at the Otterburn Ranges.

Otterburn Ranges

Otterburn Ranges

Otterburn Ranges

Twenty three per cent of Northumberland National Park is owned by the Ministry of Defence and used as a military training area. It is the shared aim of the Northumberland National Park and the MoD to encourage as much access to the area as possible.
A series of trenches were dug in 1912 by the War Office on newly acquired land as seen on Robson Green's More Tales from Northumberland. They were used for training purposes in World War I (1914-1918) and are probably the best preserved in the country. Although they are now partially silted up, some trenches remain over 2m deep in places and the dog-leg and diamond shape can still be traced.

Find out more about firing times and public access
, if you have a more specific request please contact the Range Liaison Office on 0191 239 4201 for the most up to date information.

Take the Hadrian's Wall Path. Pick a part to explore of the 73-mile route or set out on a longer trail.
Explore lesser-known ancient spots like the remains of Bronze Age burial sites at Turf Knowe in the Breamish Valley.

Relax and enjoy the striking show of colour at the upland hay meadows of Falstone and Barrowburn and enjoy the heady scents of honey of the park’s heather, ablaze with purple.
Northumberland National Park is also rich in wildlife, and you can see red squirrels, a rare black grouse and the curlew - a moorland bird with an unforgettable cry that is the emblem of Northumberland National Park.

Nightfall brings the incredible experience of gazing upwards into the darkest skies in the country. There are many places in the national park where you can galaxy gaze into truly dark skies. Look out for solar and star gazing events throughout the year at locations like the Cawfields Dark Sky Discovery Site.

Pop into the park’s award-winning visitor centre at Once Brewed on Hadrian's Wall where staff here will offer inspired suggestions and travel advice.

National Park Tea Room Walks

Taste Northumberland

A place for adventure or relaxation you can be as active or as laid back as you want.  Tea rooms and cafés serving amazing home baking provide the perfect end to a day in the National Park.

With its clear air, clean waters and dark skies, it’s unsurprising the park is officially the country’s most tranquil location.
Covering almost a quarter of the county, Northumberland National Park is one of the least populated of the UK’s national parks.

Stretching over 400 square miles of amazing landscape, Northumberland National Park lays claim to some impressive credentials. Running in the uppermost section of the park towards the Scottish Border are the lofty Cheviot Hills, while the World Heritage Site of Hadrian’s Wall is in the south and Kielder Water & Forest Park to the west.

A wonderful wilderness to explore, the Northumberland National Park has a rich array of wildlife, from skylarks to red squirrel and otters.
A place for adventure, or relaxation you can be as active or laid back as you want here.
The Northumberland National Park as seen on Robson Green's Tales from Northumberland is a huge adventure playground, with every activity imaginable, from rock climbing and mountain biking to saddling up on a bike or horse.

Secluded, peaceful and unpsoilt, College Valley is one of the most tranquil, yet dramatic valleys in the National Park. Stay in the College Valley and take advantage of its remoteness, tranquility, night skies and wildlife by being there at dawn and dusk.

Strike out on a walk among the Cheviot or Simonside Hills, explore the valleys of clear rivers including the North Tyne, Rede, Coquet and Beamish and feel on top of the world at the Otterburn Ranges.

Otterburn Ranges

Otterburn Ranges

Otterburn Ranges

Twenty three per cent of Northumberland National Park is owned by the Ministry of Defence and used as a military training area. It is the shared aim of the Northumberland National Park and the MoD to encourage as much access to the area as possible.
A series of trenches were dug in 1912 by the War Office on newly acquired land as seen on Robson Green's More Tales from Northumberland. They were used for training purposes in World War I (1914-1918) and are probably the best preserved in the country. Although they are now partially silted up, some trenches remain over 2m deep in places and the dog-leg and diamond shape can still be traced.

Find out more about firing times and public access
, if you have a more specific request please contact the Range Liaison Office on 0191 239 4201 for the most up to date information.

Take the Hadrian's Wall Path. Pick a part to explore of the 73-mile route or set out on a longer trail.
Explore lesser-known ancient spots like the remains of Bronze Age burial sites at Turf Knowe in the Breamish Valley.

Relax and enjoy the striking show of colour at the upland hay meadows of Falstone and Barrowburn and enjoy the heady scents of honey of the park’s heather, ablaze with purple.
Northumberland National Park is also rich in wildlife, and you can see red squirrels, a rare black grouse and the curlew - a moorland bird with an unforgettable cry that is the emblem of Northumberland National Park.

Nightfall brings the incredible experience of gazing upwards into the darkest skies in the country. There are many places in the national park where you can galaxy gaze into truly dark skies. Look out for solar and star gazing events throughout the year at locations like the Cawfields Dark Sky Discovery Site.

Pop into the park’s award-winning visitor centre at Once Brewed on Hadrian's Wall where staff here will offer inspired suggestions and travel advice.

National Park Tea Room Walks

Taste Northumberland

A place for adventure or relaxation you can be as active or as laid back as you want.  Tea rooms and cafés serving amazing home baking provide the perfect end to a day in the National Park.

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Wooler Tourist Information Centre

The Cheviot Centre
12 Padgepool Place
Wooler
Northumberland
NE71 6BL

+44 01668 282123

Photo gallery

Otterburn Ranges - National Park Caw Gap - National Park Rock climbing in the National Park Rock climbing in the National Park Chollerford Bridge - National Park Simonside Hills - National Park Carriages Tea Room - Bellingham Heritage Centre Thirlwall Castle Northumbrian Tea Room Hadrian's Wall Troughend Common
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