Cheviot Hills

Branded the ‘heathered roof of the world’ by The Telegraph, the Cheviot Hills are a sight to behold.

The Cheviot Hills

The Cheviot Hills

Rising up 815m is Cheviot, the largest peak of these hills bestriding the border between England and Scotland for 35 miles.  
Formed millions of years ago by volcanic lava flows, the Cheviot Hills cover an area of almost 250 square miles.

History enthusiasts will relish Cheviots many ancient sites. The Iron Age Hill Fort of Yeavering Bell is one of the best preserved in the country.  Meaning ‘goat hill’ in Middle English, Yeavering Bell is home to one of the UK’s oldest and most elusive herds of wild animals – Northumberland’s Neolithic goats. Resident moorland birds in the Cheviot Hills include Red Grouse and Ravens. You will find Curlews and Wheat Ears during the summer months in the moorlands of Northumberland National Park.

Walking in the Cheviot Hills

Walking in the Cheviot Hills

Once the rule of the Border Reivers, for whom inter-clan robbery and violence was a way of life, life is quieter in these hills today.
Horse riders pick their way along picturesque trails. Walkers have countless routes at their feet through hillsides with ever changing colours and lights.
The Pennine Way snakes its way through the Cheviots to the Scottish Border. A climb to the top of Cheviot rewards with unparalleled views into Scotland – it is claimed you can see almost to Edinburgh on a clear day - and the Lake District.

Cheviot Hills

Moorland and The Cheviots

Branded the ‘heathered roof of the world’ by The Telegraph, the Cheviot Hills are a sight to behold.

The Cheviot Hills

The Cheviot Hills

Rising up 815m is Cheviot, the largest peak of these hills bestriding the border between England and Scotland for 35 miles.  
Formed millions of years ago by volcanic lava flows, the Cheviot Hills cover an area of almost 250 square miles.

History enthusiasts will relish Cheviots many ancient sites. The Iron Age Hill Fort of Yeavering Bell is one of the best preserved in the country.  Meaning ‘goat hill’ in Middle English, Yeavering Bell is home to one of the UK’s oldest and most elusive herds of wild animals – Northumberland’s Neolithic goats. Resident moorland birds in the Cheviot Hills include Red Grouse and Ravens. You will find Curlews and Wheat Ears during the summer months in the moorlands of Northumberland National Park.

Walking in the Cheviot Hills

Walking in the Cheviot Hills

Once the rule of the Border Reivers, for whom inter-clan robbery and violence was a way of life, life is quieter in these hills today.
Horse riders pick their way along picturesque trails. Walkers have countless routes at their feet through hillsides with ever changing colours and lights.
The Pennine Way snakes its way through the Cheviots to the Scottish Border. A climb to the top of Cheviot rewards with unparalleled views into Scotland – it is claimed you can see almost to Edinburgh on a clear day - and the Lake District.

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Wooler Tourist Information Centre

The Cheviot Centre
12 Padgepool Place
Wooler
Northumberland
NE71 6BL

+44 01668 282123

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