Anniversaries in 2013

2013 is a year to remember in Northumberland for a number of iconic characters and landmarks that have put Northumberland firmly on the map.

Emily Inspires
Emily Wilding Davison

Emily Wilding Davison - 1872 - 1913

This June marked the 100th anniversary of the death of suffragette Emily Wilding Davison and saw a celebration of her life in the town of Morpeth, where she was buried. Although born in Greenwich, Emily was a true Northumbrian who was fatally injured when she risked her life in an attempt to pin the suffragette colours to the king’s horse during the 1913 Epsom Derby.

Cragside

Built upon the dreams of Lord and Lady Armstrong 150years ago, Cragside was the first house in the world to be powered by hydroelectricity. It remains full of the artwork collected by its creators as well as many of Lord Armstrong’s gadgets, many of which remain in working order.

Lady Armstrong’s domain was the garden, consisting of one of the largest rock gardens in Europe, lakes, a formal garden and Nelly's Labyrinth; a network of paths and tunnels cut out of a vast area of rhododendron forest. To celebrate Lord and Lady Armstrong’s achievements, there will be a series of events surrounding the “Building Dreams” theme- details of which can be seen here.

The Battle of Flodden
Flodden Monument

Flodden Monument

The 9th of September 2013 marks the 500th anniversary of the battle of Flodden, when James IV declared war on England and led his Scottish Army over the borders to fight the Tudors. It was the largest battle fought between England and Scotland and ended in Victory for Henry VIII of England. James IV was killed during the battle, becoming the last monarch from the British Isles to suffer such a death to date.

Throughout the coming months there will be a series of events to commemorate the battle and its wider historical significance. Find out what's coming up.

Grace Darling

This September marks 175 years since Grace Darling’s brave rescue of shipwreck survivors.

Grace Darling was born in Bamburgh in 1815, the daughter of William Darling, a lighthouse keeper and in the early hours of 7 September 1838 spotted the shipwrecked Forfarshire on the rocks below. The Forfarshire had collided with rocks broken in half and partially sunk during the night.

As the weather was too rough for the lifeboat to put out from Seahouses, Grace and her father took a rowing boat (a 21 ft, 4-man Northumberland coble) across to the survivors, taking a route of nearly a mile. Eight men and a woman were saved as a result of their actions. For more information click here.

2013 is a year to remember in Northumberland for a number of iconic characters and landmarks that have put Northumberland firmly on the map.

Emily Inspires
Emily Wilding Davison

Emily Wilding Davison - 1872 - 1913

This June marked the 100th anniversary of the death of suffragette Emily Wilding Davison and saw a celebration of her life in the town of Morpeth, where she was buried. Although born in Greenwich, Emily was a true Northumbrian who was fatally injured when she risked her life in an attempt to pin the suffragette colours to the king’s horse during the 1913 Epsom Derby.

Cragside

Built upon the dreams of Lord and Lady Armstrong 150years ago, Cragside was the first house in the world to be powered by hydroelectricity. It remains full of the artwork collected by its creators as well as many of Lord Armstrong’s gadgets, many of which remain in working order.

Lady Armstrong’s domain was the garden, consisting of one of the largest rock gardens in Europe, lakes, a formal garden and Nelly's Labyrinth; a network of paths and tunnels cut out of a vast area of rhododendron forest. To celebrate Lord and Lady Armstrong’s achievements, there will be a series of events surrounding the “Building Dreams” theme- details of which can be seen here.

The Battle of Flodden
Flodden Monument

Flodden Monument

The 9th of September 2013 marks the 500th anniversary of the battle of Flodden, when James IV declared war on England and led his Scottish Army over the borders to fight the Tudors. It was the largest battle fought between England and Scotland and ended in Victory for Henry VIII of England. James IV was killed during the battle, becoming the last monarch from the British Isles to suffer such a death to date.

Throughout the coming months there will be a series of events to commemorate the battle and its wider historical significance. Find out what's coming up.

Grace Darling

This September marks 175 years since Grace Darling’s brave rescue of shipwreck survivors.

Grace Darling was born in Bamburgh in 1815, the daughter of William Darling, a lighthouse keeper and in the early hours of 7 September 1838 spotted the shipwrecked Forfarshire on the rocks below. The Forfarshire had collided with rocks broken in half and partially sunk during the night.

As the weather was too rough for the lifeboat to put out from Seahouses, Grace and her father took a rowing boat (a 21 ft, 4-man Northumberland coble) across to the survivors, taking a route of nearly a mile. Eight men and a woman were saved as a result of their actions. For more information click here.

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